John Murray

John Murray's picture
Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Physics, and Neuroscience
40 Temple Street, Suite 6E
203-737-2382
Research Areas: 
Biophysics
Research Type: 
Theorist
Current Projects: 

Investigating the dynamics and function of neural circuits

Biographical Sketch: 

John D. Murray is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry, with secondary appointments in Physics and Neuroscience. Dr. Murray trained in Physics and Mathematics at Yale University (B.S. '06, Ph.D. '13). For his PhD in Physics, he worked with Dr. Xiao-Jing Wang in the field of Computational Neuroscience. Following his graduate training, he was a Postdoctoral Associate at New York University. In 2015 he joined the faculty at Yale, where he directs a computational neuroscience lab at the interface of physics and biology, studying the dynamics and function of neural circuits across multiple scales of complexity, through a variety of approaches including theoretical analysis, computational modeling, and analysis of neural data.

Teaching Interests: 

Computational Neuroscience

Education: 
Ph.D. 2013, Yale University
Selected Publications: 
* Ehrlich DB, Murray JD (2021) Geometry of neural computations unifies working memory and planning. bioRxiv 10.1101/2021.02.01.429156.
 
* Gu QL, Lam NH, Wimmer RD, Halassa MM, Murray JD (2021) Computational circuit mechanisms underlying thalamic control of attention. bioRxiv 10.1101/2020.09.16.300749.
 
* Demirtas M, Burt JB, Helmer M, Ji JL, Adkinson BD, Glasser MF, Van Essen DC, Sotiropoulos S, Anticevic A, Murray JD (2019) Hierarchical heterogeneity across human cortex shapes large-scale neural dynamics. Neuron 101:1181.
 
* Murray JD, Bernacchia A, Roy NA, Constantinidis C, Romo R, Wang X-J (2017) Stable population coding for working memory coexists with heterogeneous neural dynamics in prefrontal cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114:394a.
Thesis Advisor: 
Xiao-Jing Wang
Dissertation Title: 
Specialization of neural circuits for cognition: linking structure to function through dynamics